Two Nuclear Fusion Research Programs that Could End the Nuclear Fission Regime

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Nuclear energy is any energy that is produced by the interaction of atomic particles. Nuclear fission energy for example, is the energy produced when a neutron breaks away an atom into other elements. This energy is primarily used in modern day nuclear reactors.

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Traveling Wave Reactors: Pushing Nuclear Fission Energy Technology Forward

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Nuclear energy is generally viewed by the public as a long-sustaining source of energy, capable of powering a machine for many years without refueling. Though this is essentially true, in reality the way we harness nuclear energy is very inefficient. Only three to five percent of the total energy output of a fuel rod is actually used within a reactor.

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Nuclear Power Generation a Cleaner Alternative

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During the industrial revolution coal was consider the gold standard for generating electricity. It was cheap, abundant and easy to access. It wasn't until the 1970's that the environmental effects of burning coal was brought home when sulfur dioxide was found in what was termed acid rain in the eastern part of the country from pollutants emitted into the atmosphere in the central U.S.

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Nuclear Power as Renewable Green Energy

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November 1, 2012

The labeling of nuclear power as "renewable" or "green" has been a source of litigious contention for several years now. The difficulty is that nuclear power releases significantly less carbon emissions than conventional energy sources, but it does, nevertheless, have a detrimental impact on the atmosphere's air, and therefore cannot be categorized with energies such as wind or solar power.

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Non-renewable Nuclear Power Support Fading

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In 1951, when the Arco, Idaho experimental station produced about 100 kilowatts of electricity using a nuclear reaction, the quest was on to use what was, up until this time, nuclear fission that was used for war. Developed during what was called the Manhattan Project that led to the bombings in Japan that ended World War II, the very first nuclear power reactor put out about five megawatts of electricity in Russia's power grid in 1954.

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Ways to Make Nuclear Energy Safer in the 21st Century

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Nuclear energy, though proven a far superior energy source than oil and coal, has its own disadvantages and inherent risks. The dangers posed by nuclear power plants are mostly associated to the fact that nuclear fuel rods always need to be actively monitored, to prevent the worst-case scenario that is commonly known as a nuclear meltdown.

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Reasons Why Nuclear Energy Isn't as Efficient as You Think

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Nuclear energy is always considered as a great source of energy that is capable of outlasting most conventional sources of energy today. Aircraft carriers and submarines are installed with nuclear reactors to keep them operational for many years without refueling. Spacecraft that are sent to areas where sunlight is scarce are installed with nuclear engines to provide power to it for its entire mission. Nuclear power plants are capable of powering very large urban areas like no other coal power plant can.

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Comparison of Green Energy and Nuclear Energy

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The labeling of nuclear power as "renewable" or "green" has been a source of litigious contention for several years now. The difficulty is that nuclear power releases significantly less carbon emissions than conventional energy sources, but it does, nevertheless, have a detrimental impact on the atmosphere's air, and therefore cannot be categorized with energies such as wind or solar power.

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